“I’m too old / fat / out of shape for yoga”

This last week – for the first time in my life – my feet lifted off the floor in the very tricky arm balance bakasana (or crow pose).

I am almost half a century old and a couple weeks ago – for the first time in my life! – I conquered that fear of falling on my face, and I had patiently gained the strength and core integrity to balance on my hands.

This is more impressive than you might realize!

It is a lot harder as an adult to learn new physical skills or feats of strength – than it is to return to habits of childhood!

I didn’t grow up with any gymnastics, calisthenics, or attendant practice. When you see me doing what I can do – I had to earn that in adulthood, after decades of life, after giving birth to two children, and while living as a working class artist (meaning: life is hard!)

The hanumanasana (front splits) you see me chilling into, in class – well you are seeing me do something I’ve never done before.

I had to get there with these weathered bones and aged muscles! LOL

Another thing:

You also might have noticed I am fat. It’s true!

And –

It has to be said I don’t dress like a “yoga teacher”. I am not in fashionable leggings and a cute sports top. Half the time my hair gets in the way as we flow and I’m always trying to tie and push it back.

It’s not that I don’t take pride in how I dress, it’s that I have had to carefully allocate yoga funds to building the space. I’ve put retained yoga earnings into shelving, rent, security deposit, insurance, licensure etc etc. And that’s okay – because I made these priorities with intention.

Here’s what I mean, though:

It’s true I don’t look like a yoga teacher, or even a yoga practitioner.

But if¬†I’d waited to start yoga until I “looked the part” –

I’d never have started.

***

Why am I sharing all this? Because:

I am trying to WREST the true nature of yoga away from the American fitspo culture chokehold.

If you scroll the Instagram “yoga” tag (Instagram is currently the largest social media platform out there) – you’ll see youthful, slim, mostly white, aspirationally-dressed and very athletic practitioners hitting difficult poses – usually showcased in elegant, pristine locations.

The truth is…

Yoga isn’t like that.

I mean SOME yoga will look like that – all tidy and slim and clean and wealthy or wealth-adjacent. And that’s just fine.

But…

If you wait to have all those ducks in a row, you’ll never start.

And precisely WHO is getting cheated if you skip yoga until you “look like” a yoga practitioner?

(Spoiler: YOU are getting cheated).

Yoga is messy and goofy. Yoga we’re practicing in a thousand-year old sports bra. Yoga we spy a hairball in the corner of the room as we’re moving to chill in our ardha kapotasana. Yoga is arriving almost-late to class and feeling cranky and annoyed. Yoga is getting a bitchy attitude that someone else in class can do a pose “better” than you. Yoga is accidentally farting in pavanmuktasana (hey, there’s a reason it’s called “wind-relieving pose”)!

Yoga isn’t about perfection.

It’s about daily intention – and the action to back our intensions up.

I’ve created the Little Switch Yoga space to be clean, reliable, and electric.

No hairballs! ūüôā I’ve created a peaceful space with good props, a lot of laughs and some music and tea to share!

I’ve carved out this space, right here in Grays Harbor.

There won’t be another space like it, if it goes.

Now is the PERFECT time for you to see if yoga can serve you –

The way it has served young and old, fat and thin, disabled and temporarily able-bodied, rich and poor.

You are worth going through this trouble.

You really are!

I’d love to see you on the mat!

how to prepare for your yoga class

No yoga class is exactly like another, but I’ve been going to classes so long I often forget that a lot of people don’t know what to expect. One of the things I forget is that if you’re new to yoga, it can be hard to know what to expect.

So here’s a list! These guidelines certainly work for Little Switch classes and will do you well in most any yoga class you attend.

Arrive on time, and prepared to practice.

Please arrive with time to spare so that you can settle on your mat, silence your phone, and be ready to practice with the rest of the class.

Wear comfortable clothes – and dress in layers.

There is no yoga “uniform”. Wear what feels comfortable to you. I see a lot of leggings and tank tops on Instagram/TikTok but remember those are yoga influencers. As practitioners, we wear clean clothes that are comfortable to move in! Maybe leggings, maybe tank tops, maybe not. Wear something cozy – that’s it.

I like to advise wearing layers as it’s impossible to find the perfect temperature that pleases everyone! You may get warm during practice and want to remove a layer; then while we rest at the end of class, you may want to cozy up. My personal recommendation? Very warm socks, for savasana.

In general, we practice barefoot. But if you want to keep your shoes on or wear socks, just be mindful during any balance or wide-legged standing poses.

If you can, buy yourself a mat.

I have mats at the studio you are welcome to use! But I highly advise getting your own. This is for three reasons:

1. to invest in yourself and your practice – to show your commitment to quality props and materials for your own use.

2. the studio mats are great for padding – but paying for a more upscale mat provides more access to poses. I personally like Jade, and Manduka mats. They are positively no-slip! When I practice on a lower-quality mat, I always feel a bit impeded.

3. if you have a mat you bring to and from class, you may start practicing at home, too! It’s nice to get used to your mat. You come to have a fond feeling about it!

Now – mats can be expensive. It may take time to save up. But I have found the expense of a better-quality mat, is far outweighed by the health benefits that regular practice delivers!

Let the instructor know of any special needs or requests you have.

A group class cannot tailor to one individual at the expense of the group; however, your instructor is trained and qualified to help you with anything you need. Many times your requests can be accommodated – so don’t be shy!

Some examples of special needs or requests you may have:

1. Let your instructor know if you are experiencing pain or soreness. The instructor can then help you be as comfortable as possible during class, with suggestions and/or props.

2. Let your instructor know if you are new or newish to yoga! They will tailor the class with more helpful explanation than they might otherwise.

3. Let your instructor know if you are sensitive to sound or scent. Each class is listed with a full explanation of sensory and adaptive information. But your instructor will accommodate you as much as possible!

Make sure you are neither too hungry or too full.

Life is busy and sometimes we make mistakes – I once taught two classes back-to-back after consuming a huge lunch of spicy nachos! Oof!

While we can’t expect perfection here, it’s worth noting that going to class while too hungry will be distracting and even cranky-inducing; going to class while too full can foment discomfort.

Remember – it’s your practice, so listen to your body.

You don’t have to do an asana (pose) that doesn’t feel right – ever! In yoga, listen to your body. Follow the cues of your breath and body. As long as you aren’t disrupting the class or other students’ safety and participation, you really REALLY can do what you need to on the mat.

I don’t just talk the talk on this one. MANY times I’ve been in a class that was a little too intense, or fast, or whatever – and I did exactly what I needed to for myself, rejoining the class practice when I was ready. In fact to be honest, this was one of the most liberating moments in my yoga history. This helps me walk into any class with confidence – I know I’m going to take care of myself. Put that into practice for YOUR body and mind, and your yoga experience will soar!

Ask yourself *why* you practice!

This may be the scariest suggestion on this list!

Ask yourself WHY you practice. You can do this on your way to class, after class – or during an introspective moment in class.

Don’t feel like you need to come up with an answer right away. Don’t pressure yourself either! Just ask yourself. I’ll tell you, I practiced for YEARS and asked myself and many days the answer was, “I don’t know!” And that’s okay. Because over time, this regular check-in helped me really solidify the fact that I was finding practice beneficial. I’m glad I didn’t just go to class on autopilot – because I’d have quit by now!

I hope you’ve found this post helpful!

We’d love to practice with you. Click here to book a class!

why a sliding scale business?

A sliding scale business model is rare – but I choose to believe it’s still a wise build when engineered well.

In a sliding scale, either the business sets the criteria for the rate the client is charged, or the client chooses the rate they wish to pay.

I have chosen the latter option.

Since I am trusting you to self-select, I ask that you take responsibility for that choice. I don’t need any “advice” or criticism about the structure itself.

You can trust me that I’ve done the math correctly. ūüôā

My Membership page hosts a pretty thorough explanation and provides multiple options for participating with Little Switch. I always tell interested parties to make sure to read it carefully before committing.

If the implications of the sliding scale is too stressful for you and you don’t want to apply for work scholarship, you can always pay the regular per-class fee.

I also gently remind anyone reading here that there are so many other yoga options out there. Little Switch won’t be for everyone!

Given you want to read on, here’s what you need to know:

Little Switch’s sliding scale lets you self-select your level, trusting that you’ve read through the material and made the choice right for you. Please do not reach out to criticize or “advise” me on the conditions therein.¬†

I will be regularly sharing the expenses and efforts of running Little Switch through email and social media. This is not only for my sake and for Little Switch’s sake, but to better inform the community I’ve seen too many wonderful projects fall apart due to the burn-out of the facilitator, who does not share the load.

Little Switch does have a corporate mentality. Little switch has a community mentality, and a collective set-up. That sounds well and good but it can be difficult for some people to get their head around. Some people always suspect some kind of egregious profit motive. That’s just not the case here. My mission is to provide a clean, reliable, electric yoga space and I am more transparent than most businesses in how I do this.

Please remember that creating this space and organizing this space takes a great deal of effort and considerable expertise. I am not in need of business advising at this time.

Thank you so much for your careful consideration and ALL forms of support you provide!

We are now at the historic Vasa Hall!

Nothing ever is as hard as keeping good news to myself so when I tell you I have been BURSTING AT THE SEAMS trying to contain myself!

As of February, Little Switch Yoga will be operating at the historic Vasa Hall in Hoquiam.

Not to sound trite, but –

This is a dream come true for me!

I was very, very particular about the space I would take on.

The Vasa Hall is an incredible historic space in Hoquiam that has a long history – not just in regards to the original Swedish Vasa oganization, but in later iterations as a significant music venue.

It’s almost a hundred years old!

And yes, I went to high school dances there in its tenure as a Moose Hall! 

I am sad to say that so many historic buildings here are left to rot and die – not because we locals do not love our history but because we are an economically-depressed area, and it costs a lot of money to keep these buildings up.

Fortunately, a local construction group acquired the Vasa and has restored and upgraded it beautifully – absolutely beautifully! I am in good company next to the Red Cedar, Solid Coffee, and The Hive –¬† and we have another business taking up residence soon!

***

As for me?

My family goes deep, here in Hoquiam. My great grandparents settled here to start a family. Great-grandpa was an entrepreneur who lived and worked just a few blocks away from this very Hall. He was a titan of (tiny little) Hoquiam and flew the first mail plane to the Harbor!

I am a fourth-generation Hoquiam entrepreneur and I’m so proud of this.

I am also proud of the TYPE of enterprise I am bringing.

It’s different than anything we’ve previously had.

[gulp!]

My yoga space will prioritize constructive community effort, mental, emotional and physical strength-building, JOY, and the sacred space of interpersonal connection.

I will also host the only sliding-scale yoga business in the whole Harbor.

This is a big leap for me.

And I will be honest: I’m kind of nervous!

But it’s time for me to make a move!

Please keep your eyes peeled and your ears pricked –

Because I’m canvasing the community (survey below)! –

And one of the best ways you can help, is to fill out that survey and check “yes” to staying on my email list!

***

A few more words.

Just last night after Sunday group I talked to two of my students. One of them said she almost started crying at the way I gave each student “permission” to stop pushing themselves in a certain pose.

We talked for a while – it felt so good to talk about something I love so much! – and I finally said:

“It takes time to overcome fitspo culture.”

I’ve talked about fitspo before. I’m not here to go on at length now.

But what I will say is this:

The reason people know yoga is good for them – but don’t make time to practice – is because we’ve been squeezed out of our own life.

We don’t deeply believe we deserve good things.

Maybe we know – IN THEORY – that we deserve good things.

But our actions show that we don’t make time for them.

Now –¬†

I can’t change someone’s mind, or someone’s priorities.

All I can do is offer up the absolutely best-engineered space possible for this wholesomeness, this blooming, this joy and electricity to flourish!

And that’s my commitment.

I hope I succeed.

I hope I can pay rent.

By the end of the year, I hope to pay myself even a little.

But.

I can only do my best.

Can I count on you for your support?

***

Another note: I simply cannot overstate my gratitude to Maija Nordin and Gayle Russell for letting Little Switch have a home in 2023. Without business owners helping me rent at a low price-point, I could not have built a practice that let me step into Big Boy rent.

As for Big Boy rent!

My expenses have gone UP, and within the next few weeks you’ll see my class offerings going up, as well.

I’ve been studying, crafting, and modeling several options AND I now have a survey!

Please trust I have worked very hard and put a lot of thought AND taken professional advice.

What I could use from YOU, is your feedback.

So please please, take time to fill out the survey!

You can do so, here!

This will help us all so much.

***

Finally:

I am so, so grateful for everyone who attended class in my studio in 2023! Each of you has a special surprise coming your way before the month is up! Make sure to stay on my email list and keep your eyes open!

I am so excited about this new move. It’s a BIG move and I know I’m bringing my best self. It’s time to let the community come together in a bigger way!

Little Switch Yoga historic Vasa Hall in Hoquiam, Washington

“yoga is for the willing, not the flexible”

Two of the biggest misconceptions I hear about yoga asana are:

1. Yoga is light stretching; and

2. Yoga is for peaceful, serene people

I’d like to address misconception #1 today – and get around to misconception #2 soon.

Yoga is not about “stretching” –

and you don’t need to be flexible to practice.

I heard it said a while back (and I’m not sure who to credit):

“Yoga is for the willing, not the flexible.”

I love that!

***

Listen – people associate yoga so much with “stretching” that they think the whole purpose is to be nice and bendy.

In fact we yoga teachers hear it all the time:

“I’d love to take yoga but I’m not flexible!”

So listen:

You get (more) flexible (and strong) by PRACTICING YOGA.

And even bendy people are often working hard in class, too!

I mean –

Do you really think that yoga practitioners are mostly just posing and showing off stuff that comes easily to us?

(Hint: not really!)

Yoga asana helps us GET strong, BECOME more flexible, and GAIN mobility.

To wit: I am forty-six years old and I can do things my body has never done before!

But I wouldn’t be here, if I hadn’t practiced.

Yoga GAINS you those things.

Sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly.

And I encourage you not to compare yourself to others – ever.

Because there will always be someone stronger, more flexible, wearing more stylish yoga gear, someone younger – all that stuff.

I want to know if YOU want to feel better in your body, mind and spirit?

If so –¬†

Yoga may be just for you!

Remember:

You can practice yoga anywhere, anytime. Yoga doesn’t only “count” if you have a certain ability level, or if you practice a certain way, or for a certain duration.

ALL YOGA COUNTS.

My job as an instructor is to help YOU start to have fun in your practice!

Once you start enjoying yoga asana, you’ll come back.

And you’ll be on your way to reducing stress, feeling better, strengthening your body and your mind –¬†

and just chilling out a bit more!

It takes time, and it takes patience.

But time is passing anyway.

If you’re on my page, it’s probably because you want to make the most of our precious time on this green planet!

And I for one, am ready to practice WITH you!

See you soon!

– Agni

***

* A reminder!

“Yoga” means all eight limbs of yoga – a lot more than poses or a workout.

But for this particular post, I’m talking about yoga asana – the THIRD LIMB of yoga.

why I don’t say “namaste” at the end of class

I¬†don’t say “namaste”¬†at the close of class.¬†

This is a deliberate choice on my part, and here are some reasons why:

1. Many South Asians object to this, or at the very least find it annoying; because:

2.¬†“Namaste” doesn’t mean what many white American yoga teachers say it means:¬†The Light Within Me Honors The Light Within You“. It actually means something more like,¬†“greetings to you”, or even “‘sup?”

3. “Namaste” has been over-commercialized and, frankly, bastardized. You may have noticed¬†all the t-shirts and yoga bags out there – MANUFACTURED IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH IN SWEATSHOPS, MIND YOU – cultivating a “spiritual gangster” or a groovy “yoga chic” message. That is not for me.

4. If I’m going to teach yoga, all eight limbs of yoga, and lead my students through this learning journey¬†then I think¬†we owe it to the practice to deepen our understanding wherever we can.

I don’t say “namaste” at the close of class.

I¬†do say “Om Namah Shivaya” and I invite you to join me!

But you can say anything you like at the end of class – for instance, you could simply say “thank you!” –¬†or you can¬†refrain from speaking and bowing.

Please do what feels comfortable.

Remember, I am here to provide space, safety, nurture and care!

(and of course, share some of my yoga education!)

Thank you for listening!

seven things i love my students to do

Yoga asana class is hard. 

As a student you’re meant to listen to and watch the instructor, to work with the breath (pranayama), to follow the instructor’s verbal and physical cues, to work on your alignment – all at the same time!

So!

When someone comes back to class at all – I count that as a huge victory!

Therefore if you’ve made time for yoga this year – give yourself massive props!

And if you want to go above and beyond, I’ve got a list of seven things I love from my students:

I love it when they challenge themselves.

I have definitely seen students taking half-hearted or lukewarm positioning on the mat. There are a lot of possible reasons for this. Some students lack proprioception – they honestly don’t KNOW what it means to take a large step on the mat, for instance. Some students are scared to over-exert themselves. Still others don’t really, REALLY want to be there.

Now I would rather a student was cautious, than to push themselves too hard!

But also… I mean, we signed up. We paid the fee. We got dressed. We got our butts to the studio.

So let’s do some WORK!

When I look out at my students and see sweat, and a bit of trembling, and focused expressions – that feels awesome.

I am literally WATCHING them get stronger, and watching them build  more self-confidence.

It’s cool beans!

I delight when my students breathe deeply!

A lot of students hold their breath or don’t focus on their breath, because they’re busy trying to follow the pace of the class. That makes sense! I sometimes lose conscious contact with my breath when I’m a student, too.

But when students breathe deeply, I can usually hear them and it feels so good!

It really, really helps regulate the entire class as well!

There are certainly apocryphal tales of yoga students who breathe WAY too loud or ostentatiously. But honestly? In my many years of class, I haven’t come across much of that.

So when I hear students breathing deeply, I feel confident they are focusing – and getting a benefit. After all – breath work is PROVEN to help with stress.

And I definitely want all of us to experience less stress!

I appreciate it when students interrupt and/or ask questions!

This statement I deliver with a caveat as there are definitely teachers and spaces and classes and scenarios interruption is NOT a good idea.

But for my general group classes – which are for any level and any body! – we are experiencing a community vibe. And honestly, an interruption and a question is really for the best.

Yes, it can take us out of the moment to hear a voice besides the teacher’s. But almost always if ONE student has a question, the others will benefit from having the question raised. I take students’ questions seriously and I always try to respond with gladness and helpfulness. If I can’t deliver a great response in class, I am sure to do more research in the next week so I can improve my skillset.

I love it when my students grunt and/or laugh!

There is NOTHING that makes it more obvious that people are engaged, as when I hear grunts of effort or laughter! In fact last week I was upside down in a pose and couldn’t see my students, but I could hear them and everyone was laughing (because the pose was difficult for us all)!

This is a peak yoga moment as a teacher, because it means we are all efforting together. 

I honestly believe that kind of group effort is so, so rewarding!

I enjoy when students make asana requests.

There are thousands of asana and variations – there are also the Patanjali sutras, the eight limbs of yoga, the yamas and niyamas, the chakras – there is so, so much we teachers can study and draw from when we prepare a class. 

But you know what? Sometimes we really want to be of SERVICE. We want a student to come to us with a need!

So when a student comes to me with a particular pose – or say, a specialty or request – this often is a wonderful spark to help me develop a meaningful class!

I want my students to form a relationship with YOGA – not just with me. When a student ask for a focus, an asana, or an accommodation I start to think that particular student might be bold enough to use yoga for self-nourishment – not just another workout.

I am absolutely delighted when my students greet the new person – and orient the new person to the class culture.

If you’ve been to my classes you know that we are already a community. We have a culture, and we are beginning to know one another.  We’re sharing a lot of warmth and laughter!

Sometimes in a community we get excited to see one another, so we want to chat in a personal way either before or after class. And I get that!

But I love to see my students greeting the new person, and gently making extra space for them – rather than lapsing into familiar talk with the others.

Because remember: it can be intimidating to be the new guy!

So when my students welcome the newcomer, I feel so much gladness for all of us.

I am *thrilled* when my students go to ANY length to enjoy their practice.

I have a theory I’ve never seen any other yoga teacher champion – that the ONLY way we’ll keep doing yoga, is if we enjoy it.

Enjoying yoga means thinking outside the box.

How can we learn to enjoy our time on the mat? Maybe if we pay for a series, that will keep us from giving up. Or perhaps we need to purchase a special yoga mat – or some really yummy, soft clothing for practice. Maybe we need to clear a room in our house – clear it of everything but our mat, and a little shrine. Or perhaps we can make an accountability date with a friend. Maybe we need to give ourselves a five-minute guided meditation at night – and then write an affirmation in our journal.

I say: do whatever it takes to enjoy your yoga practice. Because I know a strong, sustaining practice will develop from that joy. I know it – because I’ve lived it!

***

Thank you for reading – and thank you for coming to class.

It is my honor and joy to build this community with you!

A new series: Yoga for Absolute Beginners

I’m so pleased to offer a Yoga for Absolute Beginners series¬†in March – the 19th through the 23rd of April, from 6:45 PM to 8 PM on Sundays!

In addition to our class time, each student receives a personal one hour session!

I’ll share a bit about what to expect from this series, then answer a few questions I’ve been asked.

What to expect:

Introduction to the history of yoga
Yoga is over 5,000 years old. I can’t possibly cover the history in six sessions even if I was a big expert (and I’m not)! But what I can do is give you the foundational information I wish I’d had, when I first started practicing twenty years ago!

Yoga language, yoga concepts, and Sanskrit
I’d like you to feel comfortable in a class – to know what to expect, whatever class you may end up in. Even though there are many, many types of yoga classes there are a few things I feel I can safely – and smartly – teach you, to prepare you for any setting you walk into.

The Eight Limbs of Yoga
What are the Eight Limbs of Yoga and why do they matter? Our physical health may be important to us, and that’s a good thing. But there is more to yoga than just corporeal exercise. We are more than just the strength and flexibility of our bodies.

While most the time you meet with me at Little Switch – in a group class, or private practice – we will be employing the physical arm of yoga – asana (or poses) – I want to touch on all eight arms of yoga for context. I promise: you’ll be glad I did.

Physical alignment
When it comes to asana, alignment and form are more important than trying to “look” like the instructor, or form an impressive-looking shape or feat of strength. In our six weeks I will get you grounded in alignment so you can enjoy practice, so you can stay safer in practice, and so you can benefit from practice.

Families of poses
I will lead us through varying degrees of depth of all basic families of yoga postures: standing poses, twists, hip openers, inversions, forward bends, backbends, arm balances, yin, and restorative yoga.

Yoga in Western culture
“Yoga” means an awful lot of different things. I want you equipped to find the classes – and instructors – that work best for you. My goal is for these six weeks to empower your own path. You deserve to enjoy every minute of your practice – it shouldn’t be a chore, or a competition.

Connection with the community
Six weeks together – we’ll get to know one another a little bit! I promise, you’ll feel a special fondness for the students you share this time with. Over time, I think you’ll find that’s the highest value experience of the series.

A personal hour with yours truly!
That’s right! Each one of you who enrolls receives a one-on-one hour with me to talk about your practice, about any modifications or variations that may suit you, about any injury history, and your intentions and goals for your practice.

A one-on-one session currently carries $75 fee but, if you enroll in the six week course, you receive this time complimentary. Upon enrollment you’ll receive a link and packet explaining how to claim this hour.

Again – my every intention is to bring you a safe, powerful, joyful experience that can boost you in your continued practice.

And finally…

Yes, you will get a workout!
While we won’t be huffin’ and puffin’ through a vigorous flow during the entirety of our six sessions together – make no mistake we will be moving, challenging, and strengthening our bodies!

My goal is not just to teach you more about yoga – but to help you fall in love with yoga, so you’ll be motivated and enthusiastic after we part ways!

And remember –

You can join a regular group class – anytime!

FAQ:

Am I too “out of shape” for this class?
No. However, you will be signing the same waiver every student does, affirming that you’ve discussed a yoga practice with your qualified, trusted practitioner.

If you can breathe, you can take this series.

Am I too “advanced” for this class?
Possibly! However, I am a fairly advanced practitioner and I’m designing a class I would want to take – if that makes sense! If you are fairly practiced I believe you will enjoy getting to work on the finer details of alignment – as well as connect with a grounded community.¬†

I don’t want anyone in the series who doesn’t want to be there, and who doesn’t benefit from the experience. If after reading this post you’re still unsure – feel free to email me, or meet with me after a group class.

Will you be teaching modifications in each asana (pose)?
Absolutely – although I call them variations. But: yes!

How many people will be in the series?
In order to provide a quality experience for all, I will accept between five to eight students. Any fewer, and I feel that puts too much pressure on each student. Any more, and I wouldn’t be able to provide quality attention to each student.

What happens if the series doesn’t get five signups?
You will be refunded in full, with my gratitude. But – tell your friends, so we can fill this roster and you can take the series with a buddy!

What happens if the class fills up?
Stay on my waitlist! If these series are popular, I will be sure to run them again.

***

Any other questions I haven’t responded to? Please feel free to email me directly.

I’d love to see you March 19th!

You can sign up here.

What to expect in group class

Group classes – at a studio, YMCA, or gym – are by far the most common yoga experience for most Americans.

You know the drill: you show up, take off your shoes and socks, unroll your mat, and begin with some breathing or light stretching, then soon you’re off to doing synchronous poses (called asana) with the rest of the class.

That’s the general gist!

Here’s what to expect at Little Switch.

Courtesy

Make sure to arrive five minutes before classtime at the latest – because it will take you time to remove your coat, shoes and socks, and to find a place to unroll your mat.

If you haven’t yet reviewed my paperwork and signed the waiver, make sure to be there at least fifteen minutes early – that’s 5:15. Don’t worry, you just have to read and sign the waiver once!

All are welcome!

I know almost all yoga studios say this kind of thing, but I have been to many “Beginner” classes where suddenly the instructor was throwing down incredibly difficult asana or vigorous flow sequences.

This can feel so incredibly discouraging for a Beginner.

As an instructor leading a group class, it’s not possible to personalize each asana for each student (that is what private instruction is for). My job is to hold space.

But I often teach TO the beginner (inasmuch as I can in a group class), trusting that the more seasoned practitioner can still find usefulness in each asana.

If you ever have a question if a class or particular Series are a good fit for you – simply ask me!

I do not touch students without consent.

In my first few months of class, I won’t be touching you at all! This is so I can focus on setting up the space, my verbal queueing – that sort of thing.

I am more likely to provide adjustment during private instruction, but only when needed (and usually it is not needed).

But in every case I ask before I adjust a student. I will never assume consent – ever.

I like to use props.

I am currently working on gathering more props because the more we have access to – the better!

I’ve written about props a bit before. My preference is that EVERY student brings them nearby before class starts. Even if you think you “don’t need them – they will benefit your practice a great deal, and lead you into a better and stronger place for the times you practice without them.

We conclude on time.

Just like you can expect me ready to start class on time – I’ll end class on time, too. In the first limb of yoga we practice the Yamas – and the third Yama is Asteya: non-stealing. I don’t steal your time. Your time is your most precious resource.

We end class with a longer savasana.

If you want 59 of your 60 minutes to be booty-toning, abs-busting sweaty workout – frankly, I’m just not the instructor for you.

Savasana (final resting pose; corpse pose) is important to allow our bodies and minds to absorb our practice, to allow us to begin to feel gratitude – and to let our parasympathetic nervous system kick in and provide us that rest and recover stage of physical exertion.

I recommend you bring cozy socks, blanket, hoodie, et cetera – feeling warm, supported and restful during savasana is worth it!

You can trust me.

Again: my job is to hold space for my students, and to lead you through the practice of yoga asana. I continue

I did not start Little Switch as a money-making enterprise – I am only teaching a handful of times each week.

I started Little Switch to teach all eight limbs of yoga, to foster more health, wellness and self-care to Grays Harbor, and to create a strong yoga community here.

I’d love to see you in class!

You can sign up here.

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